GFT

 

Books Consulting About Contact
.
  TheBook TheAuthor Praise Slideshow MyPlace  


"In the late summer of 2008, Andrei Kushnir braved brush, thorny vines, tall grass and whirling insects in order to capture in a painting a particularly beautiful scene of the Shenandoah River. The Washington, D.C., artist set his easel up in a woodsy spot at Red Banks, where the North Fork of the river flows. The oil painting graces the front cover of his just-released book, Oh, Shenandoah: Paintings of the Historic Valley and River. The large volume contains 263 plein-air paintings that Kushnir created during a nearly decade-long project that took him the length and breadth of the world-famous valley. Little escaped his artistic attention. As one might expect, the book is replete with scenic views. But there also are paintings such as Evening in Brownsburg, which transforms a quiet, house-lined street into a masterful work of art."
—David A. Maurer, Pulse (read the full article here)

"Andrei Kushnir's landscape paintings of the Shenandoah Valley express an atmosphere and texture that can only be achieved by the artist standing in and subjecting himself to the scene that he paints. Through his use of color and superb brushwork, he is able to realistically create his experience of the Valley's many moods—from the warm, sultry days of summer to the cool, clear days of spring and fall. Kushnir's oil paintings take us on a wonderful and intimate journey through a truly magnificent place on Earth. Through careful observation of his work, it is easy to experience what he has experienced—to feel the wind and hear the birds and insects that reside just beneath the surface of his paintings."
—Gary Freeburg, Professor of Art and Director of the James Madison University Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art

"Andrei Kushnir's plein-air paintings of the Shenandoah Valley's most iconic lands and built environments evoke the past and awaken a sense of history and memory. But look again. These shimmering paintings also witness very specific lived moments in real time. As Kushnir skillfully records fleeting daylight colors, seasons, and details of contemporary life, it is clear that he is painting a Shenandoah Valley we live in now—alive and vital, history ongoing. Paired with equally rich contextual essays, these paintings invite readers to share the artist's unique vision while beckoning us to get out of the car, too, perhaps with brush or camera in hand, and explore that landscape ourselves."
—Scott Jost, author of Shenandoah Valley Apples and Professor of Art, Bridgewater College

"The essence of a place—its geography and history—resides in its landscapes. The Shenandoah Valley is an extraordinary theater of natural features and human constructions rich in imagery and interpreted for us anew in this wonderful book by Andrei Kushnir. His luminous and insightful plein-air paintings—all 264 of them!—capture moments in time and character in a manner that invites the reader to experience the Valley's extraordinary and ordinary places. The varied perspectives, along with astute essays and vignettes by leading experts, encourage us to see the Shenandoah Valley's essential character as never before."
—Karl B. Raitz, co-editor of The Great Valley Road of Virginia: Shenandoah Landscapes from Prehistory to the Present and Professor of Geography Emeritus, University of Kentucky

"History…mystery…mythology…the words wrap themselves sensuously around the single lyrical name 'Shenandoah.' The place that bears a name spirited from a long-forgotten tongue has shape shifted over time. In Oh, Shenandoah, the magnificent paintings of Andrei Kushnir, accompanied by the softly woven essays about settlement, geography, and natural history, create a tapestry of joy in the discovery of Shenandoah's many changing faces."
—Nancy T. Sorrells, historian and co-author of Virginia's Cattle Story: The First Four Centuries

"The Shenandoah Valley is one of America's great places, on par with the Grand Canyon and New York City. Its grandeur derives neither wholly from nature nor human achievement but rather from a sublime harmony between the two. Andrei Kushnir's plein-air paintings of the Valley radiate its natural beauty. Look closer, and you'll also see the light of the human spirit—cooperation, resourcefulness, and an abiding reverence for the land and its seasonal rhythms. In a word: hope."
—Logan Ward, author of the Shenandoah Valley memoir, See You in a Hundred Years: One Family's Search for a Simpler Life

 

 

 

 

All content © GFT Publishing. All rights reserved. Cannot be reproduced without permission. Website designed by Morgan Pfaelzer.